Ghanaian Goddess

  Looking for candy, clothes, shoes, and the meaning of life

socialjusticekoolaid:

New Protest MVP Candidate! Get it girl! #staywoke #farfromover #thefutureisbright

(via flawlessxqueen)

nativeamericannews:

KU Volleyball Junior Tiana Dockery (Navajo); Talks About Breaking Stereotypes and Dealing with Racism
I was in seventh grade, I had never played volleyball before and I was the only black girl that was on the team. Next year, no one came back but me. I had racist remarks and the normal stuff against me. I never thought there was an issue with me being on the team. From then on I literally just said, I’m black, so what?”

nativeamericannews:

KU Volleyball Junior Tiana Dockery (Navajo); Talks About Breaking Stereotypes and Dealing with Racism

I was in seventh grade, I had never played volleyball before and I was the only black girl that was on the team. Next year, no one came back but me. I had racist remarks and the normal stuff against me. I never thought there was an issue with me being on the team. From then on I literally just said, I’m black, so what?”

(Source: ndnsports.com, via navigatethestream)

v-regina said: You blacks, Arabs and Indians have never invented anything, or made any useful contributions to civilization. Everything was created by us white people, which leads me to my first point: that you (or y'all, as you type it) would live in the stone age. Bye.

angrywocunited:

whitepeoplestealingculture:

whitepeoplesaidwhat:

Lmao. Take them big ol choppers in your mouth and go mimis Becky 😴

-Holly

another one for the list

Remember when I said white women are just as dangerous and violent as white men.

Here’s your proof. 

-G

Jay-Z - Tom Ford

(Source: theproblemgirl, via afirahs)

skyetownsend:

I be keeping my cool though.

skyetownsend:

I be keeping my cool though.

(via itsexclusive)

(Source: redhotrihanna)

Random Fact: from 1920 to 1960, 67% of African Americans owned businesses, owned land, owned banks, and started their own political parties in this country. It all disappeared when in the 60’s the NAACP demanded from the all white government of America to be integrated within the white culture of America. The prominent and prosperous yet segregated Black America that came to be from the 20’s to the 60’s dissolved overnight with white integration. Resulting in less than 4% of African American ownership in white America.

cupscakessnickersandgrits:

curvesincolor:

I remember a teacher in high school saying that integration weakened us. At the time I didnt fully grasp what she meant, but I’ll never forget those words. On the contrast, my older relatives disagreed with that. They lived in DC during a time…

(via flawlessxqueen)

eighthofjune:

The Only One

eighthofjune:

The Only One

(via chocolatehighhh)

thevenusnoire:

I for one think the world is ready for a black, queer, size 10 Wonder Woman. :) Took a few shots in my Wonder Woman costume which I love! Definitely plan on upgrading my armor but I’m still unbelievably happy with this! Not sure what it is about this costume but it definitely makes you want to stand a little taller and go off to be a badass.

I have more pictures in my costume at my facebook page!

www.facebook.com/thevenusnoire

(via flawlessxqueen)

digitalimprints:

Daddy duties

digitalimprints:

Daddy duties

(via lastqueen-of)

heroineheroine:

Saw this on my Instagram TL
#justiceforjulia
Instagram _locstarrr

(via the-wistful-collectivist)

#motivated

zendayacfashionstyle:

when my jam comes on

(via islandofmisfits)

I know that Black creativity has saved your life many times before. I know, because I’ve seen it happen. I’ve listened as non-Black people in my communities raised on Hip Hop talked about how it was the only relatable, empowering culture they found that also educated and radicalized them as a youth. It was formational. I’ve watched people become politicized, shaping their new political identities after bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Assata Shakur, Angela Davis and Frantz Fanon. I’ve watched as folks become activist celebrities using radical ideas from Black Power and Civil Rights movements to shape programs that do not benefit Black people. I’ve watched as people make livings and loads of social capital off of DJing Black music, dancing, walking and dressing like Black people, selling the Black aesthetic to others. I’ve heard that friends use Nina Simone and Sade to sing them back from depression, Rihanna and D’Angelo to get them in the mood. So many people in my communities, lately, have been using Octavia Butler to renew their hope for radical futures. Without Black people, what would your lives be? You might be thinking, you know, it’s so much more complicated than all this, race is complex, we’re all part of the human family, etc., etc…

Black art is not free for all damaged souls. When Nina sang about strange fruit, she was talking about a lynching…of Black people. When Black rappers say Fuck the Police, they speak to a state system of lynching…Black people. Your pain and isolation, however real it may be, is not the same as being Black. Your self-adoption into hip hop and djembe drumming and spoken word, makes our art forms all about you. You, however well meaning, have stolen Black labour and invention and used it for your own purpose. It warps the medium and changes the message, the magic, the healing. From now on, consider how the cost of consuming, appropriating, regurgitating, and getting your life in multiple ways from Black art, Black culture, and Black peoples’ creative genius detrimentally impacts our lives. Being Black in an anti-black world means experiencing daily attacks that threaten our dignity, our happiness, our freedom, and often our lives; and in order to enjoy Black culture, you’re going to have to take action to help get these back.

But because Black people’s labour, language, intelligence, creativity, and survival arts have always been considered free for the taking, you probably didn’t feel ways about using it. You probably didn’t think twice. Black culture is the most pilfered, the most ‘borrowed,’ the most thieved culture, and we’ve seen this happen time and time again.

—   

Nadijah Robinson

Quote is from her essay Black Art Is Not A Free For All on Black Girl Dangerous. Read it all. Truly exquisite writing, especially as non-Black people continue to use, consume, pilfer, plagiarize and be appropriative of Black cultural production and art while simultaneously suggesting that Black culture, especially that Black American culture, does not exist. 

I’ve also watched non-Black people suggest Black people contribute “nothing” to anti-oppression theory or praxis while their ENTIRE FRAMEWORK for approaching it is via Black cultural production or Black women’s epistemology.

Like…the cognitive dissonance proffered via perspectives shaped by anti-Blackness is astounding.

(via gradientlair)

hit reblog before i even read it

(via queerfabulousmermaid)

(via princeofthots)